Infinite Sandbox

Writer, nerd, killer of beloved cartoon robots.

95 notes

fuckyeahmarajade:

I should explain…
This is one of those vivid childhood memories that made such an impression I remember it so well even thirty years later.
I’m about six or seven years old, I suppose, on a scorching hot day at the house of friends of my older brother’s. They’re playing with Star Wars toys in the dust in the back yard, and for once I’m being allowed to join in for lack of other entertainment for me.
I pick up a particular toy – a rough looking bounty hunter type with a helmet and a big staff. I pull at the helmet, it comes off, and to my little girl surprise, underneath are feminine features. I ask one of the boys who it is, and they tell me it is Princess Leia, dressed as Boushh the bounty hunter.
A girl dressed as a boy? Doing boy things?! My young little mind is blown.
And after that when we saw Return of the Jedi on TV, I was always utterly fascinated by that scene – the Princess, not being rescued, but being the rescuer (even if, OK, it did go wrong). The girl doing everything a boy can do.
How much of an impact that little toy made on me really says something – that thirty years later I still remember it vividly. That already at that young age societies ‘norms’ for female behaviour were so ingrained in me that her existence was a shock. That somehow that simple toy, those short scenes in a film, gave me permission to be the tom boy I always was, to look at the world and think ‘I can do anything a boy can.’ A simple but powerful message I’ve carried with me the rest of my life.*
And this is why decent, meaningful female characters in films matter. Why we need Princess Leia, Mara Jade, Padme Amidala, Jaina Solo, Winter, Mirax and all the others. This is why we need Princess Leia dolls in Disney stores (and not just Slave Leia!) and far, far more than that. It’s important because yes, a silly little thing like a toy can spark possibilities in a child’s mind that can change their world for ever.**
*although as I grew up, I of course discovered that it’s not ‘I can do anything a boy can’ but that ‘I should be able to do anything a boy can, but there are a hell of a lot of social barriers in the way’.
**and that’s why we also need more people of colour, both male and female in our franchise and in our toy shops.

fuckyeahmarajade:


I should explain…

This is one of those vivid childhood memories that made such an impression I remember it so well even thirty years later.

I’m about six or seven years old, I suppose, on a scorching hot day at the house of friends of my older brother’s. They’re playing with Star Wars toys in the dust in the back yard, and for once I’m being allowed to join in for lack of other entertainment for me.

I pick up a particular toy – a rough looking bounty hunter type with a helmet and a big staff. I pull at the helmet, it comes off, and to my little girl surprise, underneath are feminine features. I ask one of the boys who it is, and they tell me it is Princess Leia, dressed as Boushh the bounty hunter.

A girl dressed as a boy? Doing boy things?! My young little mind is blown.

And after that when we saw Return of the Jedi on TV, I was always utterly fascinated by that scene – the Princess, not being rescued, but being the rescuer (even if, OK, it did go wrong). The girl doing everything a boy can do.

How much of an impact that little toy made on me really says something – that thirty years later I still remember it vividly. That already at that young age societies ‘norms’ for female behaviour were so ingrained in me that her existence was a shock. That somehow that simple toy, those short scenes in a film, gave me permission to be the tom boy I always was, to look at the world and think ‘I can do anything a boy can.’ A simple but powerful message I’ve carried with me the rest of my life.*

And this is why decent, meaningful female characters in films matter. Why we need Princess Leia, Mara Jade, Padme Amidala, Jaina Solo, Winter, Mirax and all the others. This is why we need Princess Leia dolls in Disney stores (and not just Slave Leia!) and far, far more than that. It’s important because yes, a silly little thing like a toy can spark possibilities in a child’s mind that can change their world for ever.**

*although as I grew up, I of course discovered that it’s not ‘I can do anything a boy can’ but that ‘I should be able to do anything a boy can, but there are a hell of a lot of social barriers in the way’.

**and that’s why we also need more people of colour, both male and female in our franchise and in our toy shops.

(via clubjade)

Filed under Star Wars Princess Leia

1 note

After seeing the new Hobbit trailer, I really want to track down my old copy of the Rankin/Bass cartoon.  I used to love it as a kid, but I don’t think I’ve watched it since Fellowship first came out, and that was just as a primer for that movie.

I also need to reread the book, so that’s on my short list.

Filed under The Hobbit

3,743 notes

deducecanoe:

strawberrypatty:

I think this is one of the most beautiful things in the special.
This is not even on the meta “Oh my God, it’s Tom Baker!” thing. Not really. It’s about the hope this gives for the Doctor.
The Curator is, IMHO, the last incarnation of the Doctor. He’s done all he can, seen all he can see. Now he’s Sherlock Holmes as a Bee Keeper. Instead of retiring from the action-packed life to being, like, the President of the restored Galifrey, he’s retired to Earth— his adopted home.
This is one last trip for him. It’s an extended version of the last twenty minutes of Journey’s End for him. Just think about how long he’s been in this form. He most likely regenerated into Tom Baker from Planet of the Spiders. So how long has he lived? Eleven has lived for two hundred years in his current incarnation without any real visible change in appearance. It’s possible the Curator has spent millennia in this incarnation.
And he’s a Curator. He collects things from the past. He remembers. He’s perfectly content not dashing about any longer. I like to think he watches the things his past self does, recalling the good times. He looks in on his companions in their own times. Since he’s on the slow path now himself, he can visit the Ponds without risking the destruction of the timeline. He and Jack and Barbara and Ian can meet up and laugh about watching the world pass them by very, very slowly.
The Curator is the Doctor’s reward for all he’s done to keep the universe safe.

word, bb

deducecanoe:

strawberrypatty:

I think this is one of the most beautiful things in the special.

This is not even on the meta “Oh my God, it’s Tom Baker!” thing. Not really. It’s about the hope this gives for the Doctor.

The Curator is, IMHO, the last incarnation of the Doctor. He’s done all he can, seen all he can see. Now he’s Sherlock Holmes as a Bee Keeper. Instead of retiring from the action-packed life to being, like, the President of the restored Galifrey, he’s retired to Earth— his adopted home.

This is one last trip for him. It’s an extended version of the last twenty minutes of Journey’s End for him. Just think about how long he’s been in this form. He most likely regenerated into Tom Baker from Planet of the Spiders. So how long has he lived? Eleven has lived for two hundred years in his current incarnation without any real visible change in appearance. It’s possible the Curator has spent millennia in this incarnation.

And he’s a Curator. He collects things from the past. He remembers. He’s perfectly content not dashing about any longer. I like to think he watches the things his past self does, recalling the good times. He looks in on his companions in their own times. Since he’s on the slow path now himself, he can visit the Ponds without risking the destruction of the timeline. He and Jack and Barbara and Ian can meet up and laugh about watching the world pass them by very, very slowly.

The Curator is the Doctor’s reward for all he’s done to keep the universe safe.

word, bb

(via duncatra)

Filed under Doctor Who

0 notes

Still catching up…

Hey everyone!  I’m still recovering from Comic-Con and catching up on all my work stuff after being away for a few days.  I still have tons of great messages and comments from everyone that I haven’t been able to respond to yet, mostly having to do with the Turtles panel on Saturday, which I think went pretty great.

It was great seeing everyone I was able to down in San Diego, and if I missed you, hope to see you next time.  And my inbox is still open, so don’t be shy. :)

Filed under SDCC recovering personal